New Covid symptoms are explained as people with the BA.5 variant develop night sweats

night sweats

Night sweats have emerged as a common symptom of Covid-19 as the BA.5 Omicron variant becomes increasingly prevalent in the UK.

New data from study app ZOE Covid, which has been tracking the virus throughout the pandemic, shows that in 11 percent of cases over the past week symptoms have included hot flashes or night sweats.

Night sweats are even less common than the more common symptoms; a sore throat (affecting 56 percent of those infected), headache (48 percent) and a cough without phlegm (43 percent).

However, it should be noted that the number of people reporting night sweats has increased significantly recently, particularly as it is not recorded on the official NHS list of symptoms.

What are the official symptoms of Covid?

The NHS lists the following as official symptoms of Covid-19:

  • High temperature or chills (chills): A high temperature means that your chest or back feels warm to the touch (no need to take your temperature)
  • New and ongoing cough: This means coughing a lot for more than an hour, or three or more coughing episodes in 24 hours
  • Loss or change in the sense of smell or taste
  • shortness of breath
  • Feeling tired or exhausted
  • sore body
  • Headache
  • A sore throat
  • Blocked nose or runny nose
  • Loss of appetite
  • diarrhea
  • Feeling sick or being sick

How are the symptoms of Covid changing?

Dr Simon Williams from Swansea University said: “As the virus has evolved through the pandemic, more symptoms have been added to the official list, while others have become less common.

“Of the initial, or longer established, symptoms of fever, continuous cough, and loss of smell or taste, only fever is currently among the most common symptoms.”

Loss of smell, a symptom of almost 50% of Delta cases, was submerged in the early days of Omicron during the BA.1 and BA.2 subvariants.

However, in a further sign that symptoms continue to change during the unpredictable course of the pandemic, it appears that loss of smell is starting to increase again, with “altered smell” occurring in almost 14% of cases of BA.5, according to ZOE data.

“It appears that loss of taste and smell is becoming more common again with many people with BA.5 infection reporting them,” said Professor Lawrence Young, a virologist at the University of Leeds.

“This could have to do with the way BA.5 infects different cells in the respiratory tract compared to previous versions of omicron. The body’s reaction to reinfection, especially the immune response, can affect symptoms . BA.5 appears to be more resistant to the innate immune response which may lead to a change in the symptom profile.”

A YouGov poll in May found that around nine in 10 people knew that the main official symptoms of Covid include a new and persistent cough and a fever.

Meanwhile, 87% correctly identified exhaustion or excessive tiredness as a symptom, while 84% identified shortness of breath.

Another 78 percent knew that pains are now symptoms of Covid.

“However, people are less likely to be able to identify some of these other symptoms as possible symptoms of Covid,” Dr Williams said.

“For example, less than half of people correctly identified feeling nauseous or loss of appetite as possible symptoms of Covid, and only two-thirds identified a blocked nose or runny nose.

“From my point of view, it’s clear that the best thing to do if you think you might have symptoms of Covid is to get a quick test. If you don’t have access to one, or even if you do, and it’s negative, while If you’re unwell, it’s wise to stay away from others if you can.”

More information Covid-19

What should I do if I test positive for Covid?

Covid advice differs depending on where you live in the UK.

England

Self-isolation is no longer a legal requirement in England, but the NHS advises that people infected with Covid-19 “should stay at home and avoid contact with others” to help reduce the spread of the virus.

In particular, you should avoid being in close contact with people who are at higher risk of contracting the coronavirus, for example if they are elderly or have a weakened immune system, even if they have had the vaccine.

Infected people should try to work from home if they can.

“If you are unable to work from home, talk to your employer about the options available,” says the government’s advice.

Positive cases should try to stay at home and avoid contact with others for five days after the day of the test.

Scotland

The Scottish Government recommends following the advice on NHS Inform.

If you test positive, you should stay at home and avoid contact with other people for five days after the day you were tested or from the day your symptoms started (whichever came first).

If you haven’t tested positive, you should try to stay home until you feel better.

It is also recommended that you take the following steps to protect others:

  • Work from home if you can. If you can’t work from home, talk to your employer about your options
  • Avoid close contact with anyone at higher risk, especially people with weakened immune systems, for 10 days.
  • If you have been asked to attend a medical or dental appointment in person, tell them about your symptoms
  • You may want to ask friends, family, or neighbors to bring you food and other basic items

wales

Wales continues to offer free lateral flow tests to people with symptoms. You can order them here.

If you have symptoms of Covid, you should self-isolate and get tested. Keep isolating until you get your result.

In case the test is negative, you can leave the isolation immediately.

If you test positive, we recommend that you self-isolate for five full days, starting the day after you test, and then take another test.

If the test is negative, take another test the next day. If this test is also negative, you can leave the isolation.

If either test is positive, continue to isolate until you receive negative tests two days in a row, or until day 10, whichever comes first.

Northern Ireland

The Northern Ireland Executive is advising people to self-isolate immediately if they have symptoms of Covid or have tested positive.

If you have symptoms of Covid, you should self-isolate and get tested. Keep isolating until you get your result.

If the test is negative, you can leave the isolation immediately.

If you test positive, you are advised to self-isolate for five full days, starting the day after you test, and then get another test.

If this test is negative, take another test the next day. If this test is also negative, you can leave the isolation.

If either test is positive, continue to isolate until you receive negative tests two days in a row, or until day 10, whichever comes first.

How can I get a Covid test?

The Government no longer offers free lateral flow tests to the general public. You have to buy them yourself.

There is a list of government approved suppliers from whom it is recommended to purchase tests. You can find the list here.

All these providers have self-declared against the Government’s minimum standards. However, you do not need to buy a test from one of these providers, and some providers who have completed self-declaration have chosen not to be published on the government’s list.

Approved tests are available from local pharmacies as well as high street pharmacies such as Boots, Superdrug and Lloyds Pharmacy.

It is also possible to buy them in some supermarkets and corner shops.

Boots sell single side flow test kits for £2. A pack of two Flowflex tests costs £3.95, four costs £7.90, five costs £9.80 and you can get a pack of 25 for £49.

Lloyds sells individual tests for £1.89, or a pack of 10 costs £9.29.

Prices are similar to Superdrug, where a test costs £1.95 and packs of three, five and 25 are also available.

#Covid #symptoms #explained #people #BA5 #variant #develop #night #sweats

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.