The last supermoon of the year will peak on Thursday, appearing up to 30% bigger and brighter in the sky

An airplane flies past the July full moon in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA.  The final supermoon of the year will be visible whenever the sky is clear between sunset on August 11 and sunrise the next morning, although the moon will reach full illumination at 02:36 BST.

If you’re a fan of stargazing, be sure to block off Thursday evenings in your calendar.

The moon is expected to appear up to 30 percent brighter in the early hours of Friday morning, in what is known as a “supermoon.”

The final supermoon of the year will be visible whenever the sky is clear between sunset on August 11 and sunrise the next morning, although the moon will reach full ilĀ· lighting at 02:36 BST.

A supermoon occurs when the full moon nearly coincides with perigee, the point in the moon’s orbit at which it is closest to Earth.

Its proximity enhances its brightness and size in our planet’s night sky, while on the Moon it would appear the same as normal.

The full moon in August is known as the sturgeon moon in a traditional naming system developed by early Native Americans.

Their system uses the full moons of different months as a calendar to keep track of the seasons.

The eighth full moon of 2022 is called the sturgeon moon because large sturgeon were more easily caught in the Great Lakes at this time of year.

An airplane flies past the July full moon in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. The final supermoon of the year will be visible whenever the sky is clear between sunset on August 11 and sunrise the next morning, although the moon will reach full illumination at 02:36 BST.

The Super Full Sturgeon Moon will be in the constellation of Capricorn when it reaches its peak

The Super Full Sturgeon Moon will be in the constellation of Capricorn when it reaches its peak

WHEN CAN I SEE THE SUPERMOON?

The supermoon will be visible in the UK after rising at the following times:

London – 20:54 BST

Edinburgh – 9.30pm BST

Plymouth – 21:06 BST

It will reach perigee at 16:00 BST and be at maximum illumination at 02:36 BST (21:36 ET), but because it is still daylight hours it will not be visible to stargazers in those moments

Supermoons occur because the moon orbits the Earth in an elliptical path, rather than a circular one.

This means that there is a point in its 29.5-day orbit where it is closest to Earth, and at certain times of the year it passes through that point during a full moon.

This makes it appear 14% larger and 30% brighter than when a full moon appears at apogee, the farthest point from the planet.

A supermoon is about 7% larger and 15% brighter than a standard full Moon.

This is widely recognized as the final supermoon of the year, after the last three full moons met the distance or time limitations that define it.

Some parts of the scientific community, including NASA, use the definition of a supermoon established by astrologer Richard Nolle in 1979, who classified it as a full moon that is at 90% of its perigee, the point closest to the Earth in its orbit.

However, retired NASA astrophysicist Fred Espenak calculates supermoons to account for changes in the moon’s orbit each lunar cycle.

Supermoons occur because the moon orbits the Earth in an elliptical path, rather than a circular one.  The average distance from the Moon to Earth is 238,855 miles (384,400 km), but at its perigee it is only 222,089 miles (357,264 km).

Supermoons occur because the moon orbits the Earth in an elliptical path, rather than a circular one. The average distance from the Moon to Earth is 238,855 miles (384,400 km), but at its perigee it is only 222,089 miles (357,264 km).

The average distance from the Moon to Earth is 238,855 miles (384,400 km), but at its perigee it is only 222,089 miles (357,264 km).

The moon will actually reach perigee on August 10 at 16:00 BST (13:00 ET), but will not reach maximum illumination until August 12 at 02:36 BST (21: 36 ET).

This is because, at this moment, the Moon is directly between the Sun and the Earth in a straight line.

If the horizon is obstructed by buildings or trees, it’s worth waiting longer so the moon can rise higher in the sky and give you a better view.

The moon will rise over London at 20:54 BST, Edinburgh at 21:30 BST and Plymouth at 21:06 BST, so stargazers should keep their eyes peeled for the best view from ‘then.

The Perseid meteor shower began in mid-July, but the meteors won't reach full illumination until Earth passes through most of the debris early Saturday morning.  Pictured: Perseid meteor shower over Tres Mares Peak, Cantabria, Spain on August 13, 2021

The Perseid meteor shower began in mid-July, but the meteors won’t reach full illumination until Earth passes through most of the debris early Saturday morning. Pictured: Perseid meteor shower over Tres Mares Peak, Cantabria, Spain on August 13, 2021

The annual meteor shower called the Perseids may also be visible to the naked eye that night, but should actually peak the following night.

Known as the “Fiery Tears of St. Lawrence,” the celestial event occurs when Earth plows through the galactic debris left by the passage of Comet Swift-Tuttle.

The shooting stars will be visible both north and south of the equator, although those in mid-northern latitudes will enjoy the best views.

The meteor shower is often called the best of the year for its brightness and activity, with up to 100 meteors per hour expected this year.

Unfortunately, the brightness of the supermoon may block any view of Thursday night’s meteor shower.

The name “Perseides meteor shower” comes from the fact that the meteors appear to shoot from the constellation Perseus, the 24th largest constellation in the sky.

The shower began in mid-July, but the meteors won’t reach their full illumination until Earth passes through most of the debris early Saturday morning.

The frothy delight will continue in the Northern Hemisphere for a few days after the peak with reduced activity.

NASA predicts up to 100 meteors per hour on August 13 with a meteor velocity of 37 miles (59 km) per second.

Visible meteors will range from 10 to 20 per hour at best, according to a statement from NASA astronomer Bill Cooke, while up to 60 would normally be seen.

On July 13, a Buck Supermoon lit up skies around the world as our lunar satellite appeared 17% larger and 30% brighter than usual.  Pictured is the moon rising over lower Manhattan and New York's One World Trade Center as seen from Jersey City, USA

On July 13, a Buck Supermoon lit up skies around the world as our lunar satellite appeared 17% larger and 30% brighter than usual. Pictured is the moon rising over lower Manhattan and New York’s One World Trade Center as seen from Jersey City, USA

On the night of July 13, a Buck Supermoon lit up skies around the world as our lunar satellite appeared 17% larger and 30% brighter than usual.

The July moon gets its name because Male deer shed and regrow their antlers during this time of year.

Other names, often given by Native American tribes, include green corn moon, hoer moon, birth moon, egg-laying moon, honey moon, and mead moon.

After August’s supermoon, the next one won’t be visible until August 1, 2023, but another one will appear later this month, on August 31.

FULL MOON, SUPERMOON, BUCK MOON: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

A FULL MOON it is the phase of the moon in which its entire disk is illuminated.

During the 29.5-day lunar cycle, we observe a new moon (with 0 percent illumination), a waxing moon (when the amount of illumination from the moon increases), a full moon (100 percent hundred illumination) and then a waning moon. moon (when its visible surface is getting smaller and smaller).

Because our modern calendar is not completely in line with the phases of the Moon, we sometimes have more than one full Moon in a month. This is commonly known as a blue moon.

Meanwhile, a SUPERMOON is when the full moon almost coincides with perigee, the point in the moon’s orbit at which it is closest to Earth.

This means that a supermoon can appear up to 14% larger and 30% brighter than normal, when viewed from Earth, depending on the time of year.

There are about three or four supermoons a year, most astronomy websites claim, and they happen at different times each year.

Finally, SCREAM MOON it simply refers to the time of year when the full moon appears.

Different months of the year have different nicknames, so January is the Wolf Moon, February is the Snow Moon, March is the Worm Moon, April is the Pink Moon, and July is the Golden Moon.

Historically, full moon names were used to track the seasons and are therefore closely related to nature.

#supermoon #year #peak #Thursday #appearing #bigger #brighter #sky

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.