A never-before-seen armored dinosaur has been discovered in Argentina

New discovery: The fossilized remains of a never-before-seen armored dinosaur the size of a house cat have been discovered in Argentina.  A computer simulation has brought to life the new Jakapil kaniukura species (pictured)

Steggy’s miniature cousin? Fossilized remains of a never-before-seen armored dinosaur the size of a cat with a row of spines running down its back have been discovered in Argentina

  • The remains of a never-before-seen armored dinosaur were discovered in Argentina
  • Experts say the species Jakapil kaniukura looks like a primitive relative of the stegosaurus
  • It weighed as much as a house cat and probably grew to about 5 feet (1.5 meters) long
  • It may represent a lineage of armored dinosaurs hitherto unknown to science

The fossilized remains of a never-before-seen armored dinosaur the size of a house cat have been discovered in Argentina.

Paleontologists say Jakapil kaniukura looks like a primitive relative of Ankylosaurus or Stegosaurus and may represent an entire lineage of species previously unknown to science.

It dates back to the Cretaceous period and lived between 97 and 94 million years ago.

J. kaniukura had a row of protective spines running from its neck to its tail, experts say, and probably grew to about 5 feet (1.5 meters) long.

It was a plant eater, with blade-like teeth similar to those of stegosaurus, probably walked upright, and had a short beak capable of a strong bite.

New discovery: The fossilized remains of a never-before-seen armored dinosaur the size of a house cat have been discovered in Argentina. A computer simulation has brought to life the new Jakapil kaniukura species (pictured)

Paleontologists say Jakapil kaniukura looks like a primitive relative of Ankylosaurus or Stegosaurus and may represent an entire lineage of species previously unknown to science.

Paleontologists say Jakapil kaniukura looks like a primitive relative of Ankylosaurus or Stegosaurus and may represent an entire lineage of species previously unknown to science.

The species would likely have been able to eat tough, woody vegetation, according to paleontologists at the Félix de Azara Natural History Foundation in Argentina.

The partial skeleton of the dinosaur was discovered in the province of Río Negro, in the north of Patagonia.

It joins Stegosaurus, Ankylosaurus and other armored dinosaurs in a group called Thyreophora.

Most thyreophores are known from the northern hemisphere.

Fossils of the earliest members of this group also most commonly date back to the Jurassic period, about 201 million years ago to 163 million years ago.

The discovery of J. kaniukura “shows that early thyreophores had a much wider geographic distribution than previously thought,” paleontologists Facundo J. Riguetti, Sebastián Apesteguía and Xabier Pereda-Suberbiola wrote in the new paper.

The partial skeleton of the dinosaur was discovered in the province of Río Negro, in the north of Patagonia

The partial skeleton of the dinosaur was discovered in the province of Río Negro, in the north of Patagonia

It dates back to the Cretaceous period and lived between 97 and 94 million years ago

It dates back to the Cretaceous period and lived between 97 and 94 million years ago

Fossils of the earliest members of this group also most commonly date back to the Jurassic period, about 201 million years ago to 163 million years ago.

Fossils of the earliest members of this group also most commonly date back to the Jurassic period, about 201 million years ago to 163 million years ago.

The dinosaur ate plants, had leaf-shaped teeth similar to those of stegosaurus, probably walked upright and had a short beak capable of a strong bite.

The dinosaur ate plants, had leaf-shaped teeth similar to those of stegosaurus, probably walked upright and had a short beak capable of a strong bite.

It joins Stegosaurus, Ankylosaurus and other armored dinosaurs in a group called Thyreophora.

It joins Stegosaurus, Ankylosaurus and other armored dinosaurs in a group called Thyreophora.

It was also surprising that this ancient thyreophore lineage survived into the Late Cretaceous in South America, they added.

In the Northern Hemisphere, these older types of thyreophores appear to have died out in the Middle Jurassic.

But on the southern supercontinent Gondwana, however, they apparently survived into the Cretaceous.

Some later thyreophores survived longer, including Ankylosaurus, which went extinct with the rest of the non-avian dinosaurs 66 million years ago.

A computer simulation by Gabriel Díaz Yantén, a Chilean paleoartist and paleontology student at the National University of Rio Negro, has brought the new species to life.

It shows what it was like when he walked the Earth.

The discovery was revealed in a journal called Scientific Reports.

KILLING THE DINOSAURS: HOW A CITY-SIZED ASTEROID WIPPED OUT 75 PERCENT OF ALL ANIMAL AND PLANT SPECIES

About 66 million years ago the non-avian dinosaurs were exterminated and more than half of the world’s species were wiped out.

This mass extinction paved the way for the rise of mammals and the emergence of humans.

Asteroid Chicxulub is often cited as a potential cause of the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event.

The asteroid crashed into a shallow sea in what is now the Gulf of Mexico.

The collision released a huge cloud of dust and soot that caused global climate change, wiping out 75% of all animal and plant species.

The researchers say the soot needed for a global catastrophe could only have come from a direct impact on the shallow-water rocks around Mexico, which are particularly rich in hydrocarbons.

Within 10 hours of the impact, a massive tsunami ripped through the Gulf Coast, experts believe.

About 66 million years ago the non-avian dinosaurs were exterminated and more than half of the world's species were wiped out.  Asteroid Chicxulub is often cited as a potential cause of the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event (stock image)

About 66 million years ago the non-avian dinosaurs were exterminated and more than half of the world’s species were wiped out. Asteroid Chicxulub is often cited as a potential cause of the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event (stock image)

This caused earthquakes and landslides in areas as far away as Argentina.

While investigating the event, researchers found small particles of rock and other debris that were shot into the air when the asteroid crashed.

Called spherules, these tiny particles covered the planet with a thick layer of soot.

Experts say that the loss of sunlight led to a complete collapse of the water system.

This is because the phytoplankton base of almost all aquatic food chains would have been removed.

It is believed that the more than 180 million years of evolution that brought the world to the point of the Cretaceous period were destroyed in less than the lifetime of a Tyrannosaurus rex, which is between 20 and 30 years.

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