‘Cannibal’ explosion in sun is hurtling towards Earth that could cause radio blackouts

Both explosions were released from sunspot AR3078.  One shot on Sunday and another on Monday.  However, the second expulsion has consumed the first and is now known as a cannibalistic expulsion

‘Cannibal’ explosion on sun could disrupt GPS systems THURSDAY as billions of tonnes of plasma and particles are hurled at Earth

  • A ‘cannibal’ coronal mass ejection will hit Earth on Thursday
  • A coronal mass ejection is a large cloud of energetic, highly magnetized gas that rises from the surface of the sun
  • This ejection is the second to be released from a sunspot, but it engulfed the first that was released on Sunday
  • The ejection is now a combination of the two entangled magnetic fields and the compressed plasma known to cause strong geomagnetic storms.
  • Shockwaves have a 10% chance of producing Class X flares and a 30% chance of Class M flares; both have the potential to cause radio blackouts.

A “cannibal” ejecta of energetic, highly magnetized, superheated gas is heading toward Earth and has a 10 percent chance of producing X-class flares, which are major events that can trigger blackouts in radio communication and disrupt GPS systems, when they reach our planet. Thursday.

This stream, known as a coronal mass ejection (CME), exited sunspot AR3078 on Monday and then engulfed an earlier ejection that was released the day before, deeming it a cannibal. Now it’s a “measure of both” with entangled magnetic fields and compressed plasma, highly ionized gas, known to cause strong geomagnetic storms.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) experts expect G1 (minor) to G2 (moderate) geomagnetic storms, likely to produce auroras as far south as New York and Idaho.

In addition to a Class X warning, space meteorologists say there’s a 30 percent chance the shock waves could trigger Class M flares — medium-sized events that cause brief radio blackouts.

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Both explosions were released from sunspot AR3078. One shot on Sunday and another on Monday. However, the second expulsion has consumed the first and is now known as a cannibalistic expulsion

CMEs can eject billions of tons of coronal material from the sun’s surface. The material consists of plasma and magnetic field.

These flares have the potential to cause space weather that can interfere with Earth’s satellites and power grids, and can be harmful to unprotected astronauts.

This week’s EMFs come from one of the five sunspots currently on the sun’s surface, which are dark regions that are cooler than other parts.

NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) captured an M5 solar flare from AR3078 around 5:30 a.m. ET Tuesday that was associated with a temporary moderate-strength radio blackout across parts of the Middle East and East Africa.

NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) captured an M5 solar flare from AR3078 around 5:30 a.m. ET Tuesday

NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) captured an M5 solar flare from AR3078 around 5:30 a.m. ET Tuesday

The M5 flare was associated with a temporary radio blackout of moderate strength over parts of the Middle East and East Africa.

The M5 flare was associated with a temporary radio blackout of moderate strength over parts of the Middle East and East Africa.

And in the last 24 hours, the sun has produced a total of four M-class flares and a whopping 13 C-class flares, but these are minor solar flares that have little or no effect on Earth.

“When the CME approaches Earth, NOAA’s DSCOVR satellite will be one of the first spacecraft to detect changes in the solar wind in real time, and SWPC forecasters will issue appropriate warnings. The impacts on the our technology of a G2 storm are generally nominal,” NOAA shared in a statement.

“However, a G2 storm has the potential to push the aurora away from its normal polar residence, and if other factors come together, the aurora could be seen in the far northeast, far upper Midwest, through parts of the North- Central States, and perhaps into the northwestern section of Washington State.’

The auroras were witnessed on July 19 after a solar storm hit Earth, producing electric greens and purples in the northern United States and Canada.

Shortly after, on August 3, there was another solar storm warning.

There was also a C9.3 flare that came from the sun that Sunday, but it didn’t explode on the Earth-facing side of the sun.

However, it caused enough of a stir to be picked up by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, a spacecraft that has been investigating our massive star since its launch in 2010.

There is a 10% chance that sunspot ejections will produce X-class flares when they reach Earth on Thursday.

There is a 10% chance that sunspot ejections will produce X-class flares when they reach Earth on Thursday.

Mike Cook, who works in space weather operations, told DailyMail.com that there was a coronal hole in the southwest region of the sun’s face that was spewing “gassy material”.

This improved the speed of the solar wind by shooting the solar winds into a stream.

The recent increase in the Sun’s activity is the result of its arrival towards the most active phase of its 11-year solar cycle, reaching maximum activity in 2024.

Studies have shown that the level of solar activity that is happening now is about the same as it was 11 years ago, during the same time in the last cycle.

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