The sun will die… but don’t worry, it won’t happen in 5 billion years, ESA predicts

The European Space Agency's (ESA) Gaia spacecraft determined that our sun is 4.57 billion years old, and considered it to be middle-aged.

The European Space Agency’s (ESA) Gaia spacecraft has made a chilling prediction that our sun is almost halfway through its lifespan, and when it reaches the end it will blow up and wipe out our planet, but the data from the spacecraft suggest that this won’t happen for at least another five billion years.

Gaia determined that the sun is about 4.57 billion years old, and by identifying its mass and composition, the device estimated how the sun will evolve in the future.

The path to its demise begins between 10 and 11 billion years old when it becomes a red giant and rapidly increases in size significantly.

From there, the sun races to its death, ending up as a dim white dwarf—the hot, dense core of a dead star.

For now, the sun is considered “middle-aged” and is stable as it fuses hydrogen into helium.

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The European Space Agency’s (ESA) Gaia spacecraft determined that our sun is 4.57 billion years old, and considered it to be middle-aged.

Gaia is about 930,000 miles from Earth and carries two telescopes to document the galaxy, along with studying the stars to predict its future.

And while humans have long believed that the sun will soon swallow the entire Earth, the latest data from the ESA puts those fears to rest.

Our planet is not doomed when the sun reaches eight billion years, as Gaia determined that is when it will reach maximum temperature.

At least two billion years later, the sun will begin to cool and increase in size to more than twice what it is today. It measures about 846,000 miles across.

Orlagh Creevey, a French astronomer working with Gaia, explained that it is essential to find stars similar to our sun so that we can understand how it fits into the universe.

The path to its demise begins around 10 to 11 billion years old when it becomes a red giant and rapidly increases in size significantly.  From there, the sun races to its death, ending up as a dim white dwarf, the hot, dense core of a dead star.

The path to its demise begins around 10 to 11 billion years old when it becomes a red giant and rapidly increases in size significantly. From there, the sun races to its death, ending up as a dim white dwarf, the hot, dense core of a dead star.

“If we don’t understand our own Sun, and there’s a lot we don’t know about it, how can we hope to understand all the other stars that make up our wonderful galaxy,” he said in a statement.

“It is a source of irony that the sun is our closest and most studied star, but its proximity forces us to study it with completely different telescopes and instruments than we use to look at the rest of the stars.”

Earth’s sun has a large amount of iron, which makes it burn brighter than other stars.

“By identifying stars similar to the Sun, but this time with similar ages, we can bridge this observational gap,” the researchers shared.

The sun has been in the news lately for its explosive activity.

More recently, news broke this week of a “cannibal” ejection that sent energetic, highly magnetized, superheated gas toward Earth.

This stream, known as a coronal mass ejection (CME), exited sunspot AR3078 on Monday and then engulfed an earlier ejection that was released the day before, deeming it a cannibal. It became a “measure of both” with entangled magnetic fields and compressed plasma, highly ionized gas, known to cause strong geomagnetic storms.

Our planet is not doomed when the sun reaches eight billion years, as Gaia determined that is when it will reach maximum temperature.

Our planet is not doomed when the sun reaches eight billion years, as Gaia determined that is when it will reach maximum temperature.

CMEs can eject billions of tons of coronal material from the sun’s surface. The material consists of plasma and magnetic field.

These flares have the potential to cause space weather that can interfere with satellites and Earth’s power grids, and can be harmful to unprotected astronauts.

The auroras were witnessed on July 19 after a solar storm hit Earth, producing electric greens and purples in the northern United States and Canada.

Shortly after, on August 3, there was another solar storm warning.

There was also a C9.3 flare that came from the sun that Sunday, but it didn’t explode on the Earth-facing side of the sun.

However, it caused enough of a stir to be picked up by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, a spacecraft that has been investigating our massive star since its launch in 2010.

Mike Cook, who works in space weather operations, told DailyMail.com that there was a coronal hole in the southwest region of the sun’s face that was spewing “gassy material”.

This improved the speed of the solar wind by shooting the solar winds into a stream.

The recent increase in the Sun’s activity is the result of its arrival towards the most active phase of its 11-year solar cycle, reaching maximum activity in 2024.

Studies have shown that the level of solar activity that is happening now is about the same as it was 11 years ago, during the same time in the last cycle.

WHAT IS THE EUROPEAN SPACE AGENCY’S GAIA PROBE AND WHAT IS IT DESIGNED TO DO?

Gaia is an ambitious mission to draw a three-dimensional map of our galaxy, the Milky Way, and in the process reveal its composition, formation and evolution.

Gaia has been orbiting the Sun nearly a million miles beyond Earth’s orbit since its launch by the European Space Agency (ESA) in December 2013.

During its journey, the probe has been discreetly capturing images of the Milky Way, identifying stars from smaller galaxies long ago engulfed by our own.

Gaia is expected to discover tens of thousands of previously undetected objects, including asteroids that may one day threaten Earth, planets orbiting nearby stars and exploding supernovae.

Artist's impression of Gaia mapping the stars of the Milky Way.  The Gaia mapping effort is already on an unprecedented scale, but it still has several years to run.  Gaia maps the position of stars in the Milky Way in two ways.  It indicates the location of the stars, but the probe can also trace their motion, scanning each star about 70 times.

Artist’s impression of Gaia mapping the stars of the Milky Way. Gaia maps the position of stars in the Milky Way in two ways. It indicates the location of the stars, but the probe can also trace their motion, scanning each star about 70 times.

Astrophysicists also hope to learn more about the distribution of dark matter, the invisible substance believed to hold the observable universe together.

They also plan to test Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity by observing how the sun and its planets deflect light.

The satellite’s billion-pixel camera, the largest ever in space, is so powerful that it would be able to measure the diameter of a human hair at a distance of 621 miles (1,000 km).

This means that nearby stars have been located with unprecedented precision.

Gaia maps the position of stars in the Milky Way in two ways.

Gaia's all-sky view of our Milky Way and neighboring galaxies, based on measurements of nearly 1.7 billion stars.  The map shows the total brightness and color of stars observed by the ESA satellite in each part of the sky between July 2014 and May 2016. Brighter regions indicate denser concentrations of particularly bright stars, while that the darker regions correspond to less bright areas of the sky.  stars are observed.  The color representation is obtained by combining the total amount of light with the amount of blue and red light recorded by Gaia in each part of the sky.

Gaia’s all-sky view of our Milky Way and neighboring galaxies, based on measurements of nearly 1.7 billion stars. The map shows the total brightness and color of stars observed by the ESA satellite in each part of the sky between July 2014 and May 2016. Brighter regions indicate denser concentrations of particularly bright stars, while that the darker regions correspond to less bright areas of the sky. stars are observed. The color representation is obtained by combining the total amount of light with the amount of blue and red light recorded by Gaia in each part of the sky.

It indicates the location of the stars, but the probe can also trace their motion, scanning each star about 70 times.

This is what allows scientists to calculate the distance between Earth and each star, which is a crucial measurement.

In September 2016, ESA released the first batch of data collected by Gaia, which included information on the brightness and position of more than a billion stars.

In April 2018, it expanded to high-precision measurements of nearly 1.7 billion stars.

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