Sydney woman, 42, forgets her own name after developing dementia from mold build-up in apartment

Sydney woman Amie Skilton (pictured), 42, developed dementia after living in a mold-infested apartment

How a fit and healthy nutritionist developed DEMENTIA and forgot her own name because of a common fungus found in her home – here’s what everyone needs to know

  • Amie Skilton, 42, moved into a mold-infested apartment in Manly in 2016
  • Waterproofing problems in the shower caused water to seep under the carpet
  • Mrs Skilton became very ill and struggled to carry out everyday tasks
  • I would even experience memory loss and suddenly gain 10 kilos
  • Since then, he has moved and recovered, with his brain function returning to normal

A healthy young woman developed dementia and struggled to remember her own name after she became ill from living in a mold-infested apartment.

Amie Skilton, 42, who works as a nutritionist and naturopath, had moved into an apartment in Manly on Sydney’s Northern Beaches in 2016 with her now-husband James Korber.

After a couple of months, Ms Skilton started to feel unwell and put on 10kg ‘out of nowhere’.

What the couple didn’t know was that a waterproofing problem in the shower from a previous renovation meant water seeped under the carpet every time they turned it on.

This then caused severe black mold to develop under the carpet, leading to a “systematic breakdown” of Mrs Skilton’s body and within months she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease type three.

Sydney woman Amie Skilton (pictured), 42, developed dementia after living in a mold-infested apartment

Ms Skilton began to notice a dramatic change in her health, due to a waterproofing problem in the shower from a previous renovation, which left water seeping under the carpet in the apartment every time she they used it  Eventually, it led to the formation of black mold (pictured).

Ms Skilton began to notice a dramatic change in her health, due to a waterproofing problem in the shower from a previous renovation, which left water seeping under the carpet in the apartment every time she they used it Eventually, it led to the formation of black mold (pictured).

“Some days I didn’t know how to dress. I would look at clothes and be really confused about how to put them on,” she told news.com.au.

Ms Skilton said some of the symptoms she first noticed were chronic allergies and extreme fatigue.

He then struggled to concentrate and work, and often forgot where he left his keys and phone.

“I went to fill out a form one day and I was looking at the box that said my name and I was like what’s new? I was looking at it, looking for it,” he said.

Ms Skilton had moved into the Manly apartment in 2016 with her now-husband James Korber (pictured)

Ms Skilton had moved into the Manly apartment in 2016 with her now-husband James Korber (pictured)

Ms Skilton said that because neither she nor her doctors were aware of the mold in her home, all the tests she had had come back normal.

She eventually discovered that her sudden illness was due to mold after a friend said her husband had gotten sick from a similar situation at home.

Mrs Skilton had remembered there being a leak in the garage when they first moved in, which she thought might be coming from her flat.

The couple brought in a biologist from the building who found water under the carpet and had traveled into their bedroom and study.

She said when they pulled up the carpet there was “black mold” under it and her mattress had turned green.

When the estate agency confronted Mrs Skilton, they revealed they were aware of the leak coming from her flat and had known about it for five months.

There had been an argument between the strata and the owner about who should pay to fix the problem.

Ms Skilton said that because neither she nor her doctors were aware of the mold in her home (pictured), all the tests she had had come back normal.

Ms Skilton said that because neither she nor her doctors were aware of the mold in her home (pictured), all the tests she had had come back normal.

Ms Skilton discovered she is part of the 25% of the population who have a genetic vulnerability to mould, meaning any exposure could cause organ damage.

Ms Skilton now lives in a new mold-free home in northern NSW and her brain function is back to normal.

He no longer suffers from fatigue or any other symptoms of his terrible ordeal.

Ms Skilton hopes to use her mold knowledge to help teach others after becoming a qualified mold assay technician.

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