James Webb Space Telescope photos do NOT discredit the Big Bang

This week, claims that James Webb's photos debunk the Big Bang theory and are inspiring

Since it was first proposed in 1927, the Big Bang theory has remained the leading explanation for how the universe began.

The theory suggests that the universe began as a single point, which swelled and expanded over the next 13.8 billion years to become the still-expanding cosmos we know today.

When NASA launched its James Webb Space Telescope into orbit in December, it was hoped that the $10 billion space telescope could help unravel the mystery of what happened right after the Big Bang.

Claims that the James Webb photos debunk the Big Bang theory and are inspiring “panic among cosmologists” have spread across social media this week.

However, these claims are simply not true and are based on misinterpreted quotes and data.

Claims that the James Webb photos debunk the Big Bang theory and are inspiring “panic among cosmologists” have spread across social media this week. However, these claims are simply not true and are based on misinterpreted quotes and data

When NASA launched its James Webb Space Telescope into orbit in December, it was hoped that the $10 billion space telescope could help unravel the mystery of what happened right after the Big Bang.

When NASA launched its James Webb Space Telescope into orbit in December, it was hoped that the $10 billion space telescope could help unravel the mystery of what happened right after the Big Bang.

The Big Bang Theory

The Big Bang theory is the main explanation of how the universe began.

Put simply, it says that the universe as we know it began with a single infinitely hot, dense point that swelled and stretched, first at unimaginable speeds, then at a more measurable rate, over the next 13.8 billion of years to the still expanding cosmos. that we know today.

Although most of the astronomical community accepts the theory, there are some theorists who have alternative explanations besides the Big Bang, such as eternal inflation or an oscillating universe.

Source: Space.com

The claims come from an article published earlier this month on The Institute of Art and Ideas written by Eric Leaner, an avid disbeliever of the Big Bang theory.

His paper claims that the Big Bang did not occur and cites photos taken by James Webb as proof.

However, Leaner has misinterpreted James Webb’s early data to suggest that astronomers are worried that the Big Bang theory is wrong.

Leaner refers to an article that begins with ‘Panic!’ – which is referred to as a “sincere exclamation”.

But reading the rest of the title, you’ll find that the use of ‘Panic!’ was followed by ‘At the Disks’, a clever play on words with the band Panic! At The Disco, more than an exclamation of concern.

Meanwhile, Leaner also misuses a quote from University of Kansas astronomer Allison Kirkpatrick.

“Right now I’m lying awake at three in the morning wondering if everything I’ve done is wrong,” says Kirkpatrick.

This quote comes from a Nature news article published on July 27, but does not directly refer to the Big Bang theory.

Instead, Kirkpatrick was talking about the first data that came back from James Webb about the early evolution of the universe.

The Big Bang theory is a cosmological model used to describe the beginning and evolution of our universe, based on observations, including the cosmic background radiation (pictured), which is like a fossil of radiation emitted during the beginning of the universe, when it was hot and dense

The Big Bang theory is a cosmological model used to describe the beginning and evolution of our universe, based on observations, including the cosmic background radiation (pictured), which is like a fossil of radiation emitted during the beginning of the universe, when it was hot and dense

Kirkpatrick herself has repeatedly claimed that her quotes were misused in the article and maintains that she is a believer in the Big Bang theory.

‘It’s wild. Especially since I’ve never said anything along those lines!’ she he tweeted from her account, which she has renamed “Allison, the Big Bang happened to Kirkpatrick.”

One of the key reasons why the Big Bang remains the leading theory about the beginnings of our universe is because of the cosmic microwave background (CMB): radiation. remnants of the Big Bang.

Scientists have been able to “see” this radiation with satellites, including NASA’s Cosmic Background Explorer, which was in operation from 1989-1996.

Although Lerner has proposed other explanations for CMB, all have been rejected in the past.

James Webb is not designed to see the CMB, but to see a period of the universe’s history that has never been seen before.

In a Q&A, Dr John Mather, Nobel laureate and senior project scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope, explained: “Specifically, we want to see the first objects that formed as the universe cooled after the Big Bang”.

“This time period is perhaps hundreds of millions of years after the COBE [Cosmic Background Explorer]WMAP [Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe]and Planck were built to see.

“We believe that the small temperature ripples they observed were the seeds that eventually became galaxies.

“We don’t know exactly when the universe created the first stars and galaxies, or how, for that matter. That’s what we’re building JWST to help answer.”

The James Webb Telescope: NASA’s $10 billion telescope is designed to detect light from the first stars and galaxies

The James Webb Telescope has been described as a ‘time machine’ that could help unlock the secrets of our universe.

The telescope will be used to look back to the first galaxies born in the early universe more than 13.5 billion years ago, and observe the sources of stars, exoplanets and even the moons and planets of our solar system.

The vast telescope, which has already cost more than $7 billion (£5 billion), is seen as a successor to the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope.

The James Webb Telescope and most of its instruments have an operating temperature of about 40 Kelvin, about minus 387 Fahrenheit (minus 233 Celsius).

It is the largest and most powerful orbiting space telescope in the world, capable of looking back 100 to 200 million years after the Big Bang.

The orbiting infrared observatory is designed to be about 100 times more powerful than its predecessor, the Hubble Space Telescope.

NASA likes to think of James Webb as a successor to Hubble rather than a replacement, as the two will work in tandem for some time.

The Hubble telescope was launched on April 24, 1990 by the space shuttle Discovery from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

It circles the Earth at a speed of about 17,000 mph (27,300 km/h) in low Earth orbit at an altitude of about 340 miles.


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